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PERFUMING INFO:

Raw perfuming materials are best suited for experienced perfumers. Perfumery Aromas are blends of many raw perfume materials that have developed aromas, unlike the raw perfume materials.

Aroma chemicals are manufactured smells that are used for perfuming and flavoring. 

They are the individual bits and pieces of a perfume or flavor that make up the unique complex finish. Some are wonderful in their raw state while others are odd or even stinky or no smell until they are blended.  When blended they lend particular aroma qualities to the finished perfume. Some unpleasant smelling aroma chemicals may be necessary to achieve a full bodied and elegant perfume.

Most people are familiar with fragrance oils, but not the raw aroma chemicals that make fragrance oils. Now you know where fragrance oils get their aroma.

Beginning perfumers may have more success with our Perfumery Aromas and Aroma Accords.

Some aroma chemicals MUST be used within their percentage guidelines. Click Here for a list of aroma chemicals that can cause sensitization or allergies and have restricted usage. Many of these aroma chemicals can cause adverse reactions if the guideline percentages are not adhered to. 

If an aroma chemical is not restricted, then it can be used at your discretion. The percentages you see on the page are just average usage guidelines for perfumers.

These full strength chemicals should be handled with care.

Keep all perfume ingredients away from children.

We offer our raw materials in Full strength and 50% dilution in IPM.

It’s a great idea for beginning perfumers to use aroma chemicals that are not restricted in their use.

We try to have the restrictions on the page, but we will miss some.  It’s up to you to check the aroma chemical to be sure its restriction-free.

This is the website you will go to, to find the restricted items. Home - IFRA International Fragrance Association - in every sense

Please read more about percentages, click here.

Please note the Aroma Descriptions are the manufacturer's descriptions not our Own. 

If you have more or better descriptions, please leave a review of the product for your fellow performers to read. 

Making Perfume
There can be anywhere from 1 to over 300 ingredients per fragrance formula.
GROUP BUYS:
Group Buy Buy wholesale aroma chemicals from creatingperfume.com This is a pre pay group buy. If buy is not completed within 60 days (not enough buyers) you will receive a full refund. You must purchase 125 or more milliliters.
IFRA INFORMATION
Info on the IFRA standards
how to start your own business
How to sell your perfume
FRAGRANCE VIDEOS:
See great videos on perfuming!!

Synthetic aroma chemicals.
What are they and why should I use them?

Synthetics (aroma chemicals) are manufactured smells. They are the bits and pieces of fragrance that make up unique perfumes. Synthetic aromas are a greener alternative for manufacturing perfumes. Many are scientific replications of plants and flowers from around the world.

Over the past 100 years, scientists and perfumers have created hundreds of nature identical molecules, opening the world of perfumery to a magical pallet of resources, enabling perfumers to create beautiful modern perfumes.

Some aroma chemicals are lovely in their raw state while others are unpleasant. Some unpleasant smelling aroma chemicals may be necessary to achieve a full bodied and elegant perfume. It may seem counter-intuitive to add an unpleasant animal like aroma but in the correct dosage, it can transform a formula from nice to exotic and sensual.

Synthetic animal aromas, like civet and musk, are manufactured to prevent cruelty to animals.

 Some aroma chemicals have little or no smell until they are blended. The use of synthetics helps keep trees, vegetation, and precious flowers from being depleted.

All designer perfumes you buy in department stores are made from aroma chemicals. Although the idea of an "all natural" perfume seems great, in truth, it is extremely difficult to achieve.  If you have ever wondered what fragrance oils are made of, they are a combination of aroma chemical as usually in a D.P.G (Dipropylene Glycol) or I.P.M. (Isopropyl Myristate) base. In perfumes, aroma chemicals may be in a base of alcohol, oil or DPG.

A great many aroma chemicals are synthesized from natural sources. Many aroma chemicals are also used in food preparation as flavors, especially candy and soft drinks, and also cheese and meat products. Our aroma chemicals are the same raw aroma materials used in all of the fine perfume houses all over the world. 

 

Some aroma chemicals MUST be used within their percentage guidelines. Used out of there guideline percentages, Many of these aroma chemicals can cause adverse reactions if the guideline percentages are not adhered to. In other words, if the instructions say to use something in ‘trace amounts’ think of it like the tiny end of a toothpick. 1% is 1% of the total perfume formula.  
Click herehttp://www.ifraorg.org/en-us/standards-library/snew#.UlblmlBwoZ8 for important info from the IFRA

 

These full strength chemicals should be handled with care.

Keep all perfume ingredients away from children. 

 

Aroma chemicals are manufactured smells. They are the bits and pieces of fragrance that make up unique perfumes. Some are wonderful in their raw state while others are stinky, but when used in small quantities, they lend certain aroma qualities. Some unpleasant smelling aroma chemicals may be necessary to achieve a full bodied and elegant perfume.

Animal smells like civet and musk are synthesized to prevent cruelty to animals. Some aroma chemicals have little or no smell until they are blended with others. The use of synthetics helps keep trees, vegetation, and precious flowers from being depleted. Synthetics have been used in perfumes as early as 1882.

 

If you have ever wondered what fragrance oils are, they are a combination of aroma chemicals in an oil base.

A great many aroma chemicals are synthesized from natural sources. Many aroma chemicals are also used in food preparation as flavors, candy, soft drinks, cheese and meat products. Our aroma Materials are the same raw aroma materials used in fine perfume houses all over the world. 

 

http://www.ifraorg.org/Upload/DownloadButtonDocuments/d9d4e420-8d2f-4290-a3fb-838d8449dc7d/22182_GD_2008_02_15_IFRA_RIFM_QRA_Information_booklet_V6.0_(46th_IFRA_Amendment).pdf

 

Perfumes fall under the category 4 within the IFRA guideline booklet.

QRA INFORMATIONAL BOOKLET VERSION 5.0

IFRA RIFM QRA Information Booklet V5.0 12 Last updated: June 7, 2010

Product Type Maximum Pragmatic Level Comments

Category 4

Not Necessary Acceptable Exposure Level

derived from QRA

Hydroalcoholic Products Applied To Unshaved Skin (includes

body mists (aqueous based, alcoholic based and

hydroalcoholic))

Hair Styling Aids, Hair Sprays of all types (pumps, aerosol

sprays, etc.)

Body Creams, Oils, Lotions, Fragrancing Creams of all types

(except baby creams and lotions)

Products that contain sunscreen or sunblock are not listed separately and are

included in the major product type (e.g. lip creams containing sunscreen are

included in the lip products category).

Ingredients of Perfume Kits

Fragrance Compounds for Cosmetic Kits

Scent Pads, Foil Packs

Scent Strips for Hydroalcoholic Products

These product types have been placed in Category 4 based on the absence of

exposure data, but it is recognized that these products have similarities to

hydroalcoholic products applied to the unshaved skin. Should exposure data become

available, these product types may be re-categorized.

Foot Care Products

This product type has been placed in Category 4 based on the absence of

exposure data, but it is recognized that this product is similar to body creams,

lotions. Should exposure data become available, this product type may be recategorized.

Hair Deodorant

This product type has been placed in Category 4 based on the absence of

exposure data, but it is recognized that this product is similar to hair styling aids

and hair sprays. Should exposure data become available,

 

About Musk

In 1981 the nitro musks were restricted mainly because of a certain toxicity(neurotoxicity) and their phototoxicity, but besides they also caused ecological concerns due to their poor biodegradability.

Taking their place

Macrocyclic musks

 

 

Muscone, a macrocyclic musk

A class of artificial musk consisting of a single ring composed of more than 6 carbons (often 10-15). Of all artificial musks, these most resemble the primary odoriferous compound from Tonkin musk in its "large ringed" structure. While the macrocyclic musks extracted from plants consists of large ringed lactones, all animal-derived macrocyclic musks are ketones.[2]

Although muscone, the primary macrocyclic compound of musk was long known, it was only in 1926 that Leopold Ruzicka was able to synthesize this compound in very small quantities. Despite this discovery and the discovery of other pathways for synthesis of macrocyclic musks, a compound of this class was not commercially produced and commonly utilized until the late 1990s due to difficulties in their synthesis and consequently higher price.[4]

About half the human population are anosmic (unable to smell) to macrocyclic musks, possibly due to its high molecular weight. Common macrocyclic musks include:

Ethylene brassilate

Globalide (also available as Habanolide, trademark of Firmenich SA)

Ambrettolide

Muscone

Thibetolide (Exaltolide)

Velvione

Alicyclic musks

 

 

Helvetolide, an alicyclic musk

Alicyclic musks, otherwise known as cycloakyl ester or linear musks, are the relatively novel class of musk compounds. The first compound of this class was introduced 1975 with Cyclomusk, though similar structure was noted earlier in citronellyl oxalate and Rosamusk[5]. Alicyclic musks are dramatically different in structure than previous musks (aromatic, polycyclic, macrocyclic) in that they are modified akyl esters[6]. Although they were discovered more than 10 years before, it was only in 1990 with the discovery and introduction of HELVETOLIDE at Firmenich that a compound of this class was produced at a commercial scale[5]. ROMANDOLIDE, a more ambrette and less fruity alicyclic musk compared to HELVETOLIDE was introduced ten years later[6]. Common musks of this class include:

Cyclomusk

Helvetolide (trademark of Firmenich SA)

Romandolide (trademark of Firmenich SA)

Making perfume is an understanding of the aroma materials. The more you study and memorize aroma materials the better you will be at combining them. Materials being essential oils, aroma chemicals, and our aroma accords. A large array of perfumes can be created using our accords with or without the addition of other aroma chemicals or essential oils.We do not offer formulas or recipes but can suggest you read the following info at http://www.perfumerbook.com/Arranging%20Fine%20Perfume%20Compositions.pdf

allured.com the best place to purchase books and magazines about perfume.


http://media.allured.com/documents/071112fragrancemythsandfacts.pdf
http://media.allured.com/documents/071112truthaboutphthalates.pdf